Examples of Business Email Writing in English - Writing Skills Practice

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Emails in English - How to Write an Email in English - Business English Writing

In this lesson, you can learn how to write an email in English. Do you need to write emails at work? Are you worried that your emails aren’t clear, or that you make mistakes in English? In this lesson, you can see a how to write clear, natural-sounding emails easily and quickly. We’ll show you how to write an email in English from beginning to end, in simple, clear steps that you can follow right now! You can see the full version of this free lesson here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/write-emails-in-english This lesson will help you: - Write clear email greetings. - Begin an email by explaining why you are writing. - Add details to your email. - Move between ideas in your email. - Use a call to action to discuss the main idea of your email. - Learn how to sign off, or close, your email. - Practice writing an email in English using examples. Visit our website to see more, free English lessons like this one: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/

How to change Basic English into Business English

http://www.engvid.com/ Want to get that job? Improve your image? Sound more professional? Learn how to transform simple English words to business English vocabulary and watch your career take off! I'll show you how to change "get" to "receive", " make sure" to "ensure", "give more information" to "elaborate", and more. These small vocabulary changes will make a huge difference in your English level. Test yourself on this lesson at http://www.engvid.com/how-to-change-basic-english-into-business-english/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi. My name is Rebecca from www.engvid.com. Today, you're going to learn how to speak more professionally in business situations. Now, at times, it's all right to use informal language. It's acceptable in everyday situations. But there are times when you'll want to create a more powerful impression. And at that time, you'll want to be able to use business English. What's the difference between general English and business English? Well, sometimes, there's not very much difference. Sometimes, general English is used in business contexts. But sometimes, you use a higher-level word. And that's what I'm going to teach you in this lesson. Let's look at some really easy, common examples. For example, if you say -- or if you want to say, "I got your email", in regular English, you might just say, "I got your email." What would you say if you want to make it business English? You would say -- I'm giving you a clue. The word starts with R. Instead of saying, "I got your email"; "I received your email." Okay? Now, it becomes more formal and more business-like. Suppose you want to tell someone, "I need your help" or, "I need some help." What word could you use that starts with R instead of "need"? "Require." So instead of saying -- and you can also change more than the verb. The verb is the key, but you could say -- instead of saying, "I need some help", you could say, "I require some assistance." Now, you've changed two words, the verb and also a noun. Let's try another one. "Let's talk about it later." Which business word could you use? "Let's discuss -- let's discuss it later." That sounds much more professional than saying, "Let's talk about it later." Next one. "How do I get in touch with her?" What word could you use instead of that? "How do I contact her?" Okay? Good. "Please make sure you arrive on time." Which business word could you use instead of "make sure"? "Please ensure you arrive on time." "Please give her your travel plans." Instead of saying "give", you could say, "Please provide her with your itinerary." There, we've changed another word. Instead of saying "travel plan" or "travel plans", you could use the word "itinerary". An "itinerary" is usually a piece of paper or a document that lists your travel plans, when you're departing, when you're arriving, where, when, and so on. "Please let them know when you will be arriving." "Please let them know" -- instead of that, you could say, "Please inform them of your arrival." Okay? Good. "Please tell me why you've made this decision." "Please explain your decision." "Could you please talk some more about that subject?" "Could you please elaborate? Could you please elaborate on that." Now, this is actually a very useful word if you go to a conference or a meeting and you want someone to speak some more about a particular point or issue. It's a good, kind of, question to learn. "Could you please elaborate on that?" So "to elaborate" means to speak more or talk more, give more information. "How are you going to fix this problem?" Better than using the word "fix" is the word "solve". "How are you going to solve this problem?" All right? So try to do that for every simple word that you know and basic word that you know in general English, try to find a slightly more formal version, which will be your business English word. And use these words in an office environment. If you've found this helpful, please subscribe to my channel on YouTube. And if you'd like to do a quiz on this subject, you can also go to our website, www.engvid.com. Thanks very much. Good luck with your English.

English For Business Communication - (Useful Phrases, Idioms, Buzzwords etc)

Useful and practical phrases, idioms, buzzwords and writing for business communication. Have a fruitful and lovely time learning from this series of English lessons. Extending a sincere thanks to you friends for your support. Welcome You To Subscribe === https://www.youtube.com/user/allstuff33?sub_confirmation=1 Thankful to Shayna from https://www.espressoenglish.net https://www.youtube.com/user/EspressoEnglishNet 1. Ten Phrasal Verbs 2. Meetings 3. Common Writing Mistakes 4. Idioms 5. Buzzwords 6. Positive And Negative Performance Evaluations (Social Media Profiles -- https://plus.google.com and https://www.twitter.com) 【My Mum Stella San 】 https://plus.google.com/114512468123776014795 https://twitter.com/StellaSanLF https://twitter.com/StellaYeahilike 【 Anthony Zheng】 https://plus.google.com/u/0/+ZhengGaoAnthony https://twitter.com/Yeahilike Welcome You To Visit Videos Below 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAnw168huqA 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2ZDNgtAsbw 3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nXQOXYy8Cv8 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pbp-tgXH5Pk https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_English http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0) * Towards better understanding and communication in business *

Writing Effective Emails | Soft Skills Training

Writing Effective Emails | Soft Skills Training Naresh IT Online Training Program By Real Time Experts to Enhance your Technical Skills to Explore your Career High in Software Industry. We Provides Online Training According to your Suitable Timings, Live Online Training Sessions through Quality Medium. For Registration : https://goo.gl/r6kJbB Call: India- 8179191999, USA- 404-232-9879 Email: online@nareshit.com Our Online Training Features: 1. Training with Real-Time Experts 2. Industry Specific Scenario’s 3. Flexible Timings 4. Soft Copy of Material 5. Share Video's of each and every session. For Registration : https://goo.gl/r6kJbB For more updates on courses and tips follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NareshIT Twitter: https://twitter.com/nareshitech Google+: https://plus.google.com/NareshIT For Registration : https://goo.gl/r6kJbB Call: India- 8179191999, USA- 404-232-9879 Email: online@nareshit.com

5 useful email expressions

http://www.engvid.com/ Having trouble writing an email? In this video, I will teach you five useful email expressions that will help you to write better emails. I will also teach some email vocabulary such as forward, attachment, and cc, along with some ways to end emails. Is it okay to use cc as a verb? Watch this class and find out! And don't forget to take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/5-useful-email-expressions/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi. My name is Emma, and today we are going to look at some very useful email expressions. So we're going to look at five in total, and these email expressions can be used in formal email writing. So I've had a lot of students in the past tell me that they spend hours writing very simple, short emails. These expressions will help you to improve your email writing, and to write emails a lot quicker. So let's get started. Okay, so our first expression, very common: "Please find attached _________." Okay? "Please find attached _________." So, what do I mean by "attached"? So, in this case, "attached" is a verb, but "an attachment", which is the same thing but in the noun form, is an added computer file. So it's a computer file we add to an email. So, what are some examples of attachments? Well: "Please find attached my resume." This may be an added computer file. "Please find attached photos from the conference." So it's a very simple phrase. It's very polite. Notice we have "please". "Please find attached _________." And then you just fill in the blank with the computer file you're adding to the email. Okay? So that's our first expression. Now let's look at our second expression. "I've forwarded _________ to you." Or alternatively, we can also say: "I'm forwarding _________ to you." So, first of all, what do I mean by "forward"? Okay? Well, a forward... "Forwarding" is a verb, but it can also be a noun, as in "forward". So a "forward" is when you get an email and you decide you want to resend the email to someone else, so you forward it to them. So, again, it's when you want to resend an email and you send it to a different email address. So that's a forward. So what can I forward? Well, we've used resume already; we can use it again. "I've forwarded..." Maybe you're forwarding someone else's resume, so: "Bill's resume to you.", "I'm forwarding John's email." Maybe there was a good email he sent, so you want to forward it to someone else to you. So that covers forwarding. K, now let's look at some more expressions. Okay, so expression number three: "I've cc'd/cc'ed/copied _________"-and then you write the name of the person-"on this email." So, what does this mean? Well, sometimes maybe you've written an email to someone, but you want someone else to see what you've written. So the email isn't directed to this person; you just want them to know what's going on, so you might cc them or copy them. Okay? So there are three different ways to write this. Remember, in business writing and in formal writing for emails, we really want emails to be short and to the point. We want them to be concise, so that's why you may see "cc'd", not as a word but just with an apostrophe "d", meaning the past participle. "Cc'ed" or "copied". All of these are correct to use. So I could say: "I've cc'd Umar on this email." Meaning the email goes to someone, but Umar can also see the email too. So the email isn't directed to Umar; he can just see it too. So why might we cc someone? Well, to keep a person, so someone, in the loop. So this is another common expression you may hear. When you keep someone in the loop, it means you want them to know what is going on, so you keep them in the loop. Meaning now they know what is happening. Okay? Expression number four: "If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact me." So, first of all, what does "hesitate" mean? This might be a word you don't know. It means to wait. So, this can also sound like: "If you have any questions, please don't wait to contact me." "Hesitate" is, of course, more formal and it's the one that is commonly used. So this is a great way to actually end an email. Towards the end, before you say: "Sincerely", or: "Kind regards, Vanessa", or: "Emma", or: "Umar", or: "John", this is a good thing to write before the very end of the email.

Examples of Business Email Writing in English - Writing Skills Practice

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