5 tips to improve your writing

author Learn English with Emma [engVid]   6 year ago
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Fix Your English Grammar Mistakes: Talking about People

Should you say "most of people" or "most people"? "Brazilian people" or "Brazilians"? "Every people" or "everybody"? If you're not 100% sure, this lesson is for you. In this lesson you'll learn how to talk about people correctly in English. This is an important subject because, in conversation, we often talk about things people do. I'll teach you the grammar behind common sentences and statements. You'll learn to use these sentence structures correctly and to avoid mistakes that many English learners make. Then take the quiz here: http://www.engvid.com/fix-your-english-grammar-mistakes-talking-about-people/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you about some mistakes a lot of students make. So, I've been teaching English for about five years now, and the mistakes I'm going to teach you today, I've seen students make many times in both their speaking, as well as their writing. Okay? So these mistakes are mistakes students make when they're talking about people. So, I'm going to give you some examples of some of these mistakes. The first one I want to show you: "Some Canadian people hate winter." It's true, I'm one of those people; I hate winter. So, "Some Canadian people hate winter." There's a mistake, here. I want you to take a moment to look, and think: What could the mistake be? "Some Canadian people hate winter." I'll give you a hint: The mistake is somewhere here. If you thought "people" is the mistake, you're correct. "Canadian people", it's redundant. We don't need the word "people", because "Canadian"... If we add an "s" here, this means "Canadian people". Okay? So, instead of saying "Canadian people", we would say "Canadians". "Some Canadians hate winter." It's the same if we wanted to talk about Americans. We would not say: "Some American people hate winter." We would prefer to say: "Some Americans"-with an "s"-"hate winter". So, let's look at another example. "Many Brazilian people are learning English." So, there's a mistake, here. What's the mistake? "Many Brazilian people are learning English." If you said the mistake was "people", you're correct. When we're talking about nationalities, we do not use the word "people". So, what can we do to fix this? We can get rid of the word "people", and what can we do to the word "Brazilian", because there's more than one? We can add an "s". So, now it's: "Many Brazilians are learning English." Okay? So, I'm going to give you another example, this time not on the board, but I'm just going to say it. "Many Asian people like spicy food.", "Many Asian people like spicy food." Now, how would you fix this sentence? If you said: "Many Asians like spicy food." you'd be correct. So, when we talk about nationalities, we do not need this word; this word is a waste of space. We just need the nationality with an "s". So, I have another common mistake students make over here: "Muslim people". So, Muslim is a religion. Okay? "Muslim people fast"-"fast" means they don't eat-"during Ramadan". "Muslim people fast during Ramadan." It means Muslim people do not eat during their holy month, their religious month of Ramadan. So, there's a mistake, here. What do you think the mistake is? If you said, just like this, "people" is the mistake - you're correct. When we talk about religion and we're talking about Muslims, Christians, Jews, Hindus - you don't need the word "people". We could just change this to: "Muslims". So, "Muslim" here means a whole... All Muslims, it's like Muslim people, but we don't need the word "people". Here's another example: "Christian people celebrate Easter.", "Christian people celebrate Easter." How can we fix this sentence? We can get rid of the word "people", and just add an "s". We can do the same thing for Hindus. "Hindus are often vegetarian", we could say. "Many Jews live in Israel.", "Many Buddhists live in Asia." Okay? So, instead of saying: "Jewish people", "Hindu people", it's easier just to say "Hindu" with an "s" or "Jews" with an "s". All right, so let's look at some other common mistakes students make. Okay, so another mistake I often see students make in their writing especially, and also sometimes in their speaking is with "most", "some", and "a lot" when they're using these words with "people". Okay? So, the first example: "Most of people have cell phones these days." I see students use: "Most of people" a lot in their essays. So, what's the mistake, here? I'll give you a minute to think about it. "Most of people". The problem here is "of". Okay? We don't need "of"; "of" is incorrect here. We would just say: "Most people". "Most people have cell phones these days." Okay? "Most people love Chinese food.", "Most people like to play sports." You don't need "of". If you had: "Most of the people", that would be okay, but you need "the" here, although that's not as common.

How to write a good essay: Paraphrasing the question

Do you sometimes struggle to begin writing an essay when taking an exam? Good news! There is an important writing skill that will help you improve your essay introductions. This technique is called "paraphrasing", and it means rewriting something using different words. In this lesson, I will teach you how to paraphrase successfully and how to change essay questions into your own words. These skills are very useful for university and high school students, as well as any students writing English proficiency exams like the TOEFL or IELTS. TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-write-a-good-essay-paraphrasing-the-question/ WATCH NEXT: Essay Writing – 6 ways to compare: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8WSzwBD7GQ TRANSCRIPT Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I'm going to teach you something very important for if you're taking any type of test that has a writing component. So, if you are taking the IELTS, the TOEFL, the CELPIP, even just a university test, it can be any type of test, but if you're asked to write something like an essay or a paragraph, this video is for you. Okay? So I'm going to teach you a very important skill that will help improve your marks when it comes to writing on tests. So, let's get started. So, I have here an essay question. This question is actually... I've seen it on the IELTS. You know, you have similar types of questions on the TOEFL, sometimes in university. The question is this: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country. Do you agree or disagree?" Or maybe: "To what extent do you agree or disagree?" So, this is an example of a question you might be asked. Now, a problem a lot of students have is in their answer to this question. They see this, and they think: "Okay, education is the most important factor in the development of a country, yes, I agree." So then they... Or: "I disagree", and they start writing. And what do they write? Usually the very first thing students will write is this: "I agree that education is the single most important factor in the development of a country because..." So, what is the problem with this? Is there any problem to start off your essay with something like this, or to start off your answer? There's a big problem. So I want you to take a moment and think: "What could be the problem with starting your essay off with this sentence?" Okay, well, if you noticed, you have here the word: "education, education, is, is, the single most important, most important factor". If you notice, these are the same. They're the exact same, except for: "I agree that" and "because". The student, here, has used the exact same wording that is in the question. So, if you do this on the IELTS-and many students do this, same with on the TOEFL-you actually will lose marks, and same with in university, because you're not showing your abilities; you're just copying what somebody else has said or what the essay question is. So, in this video, I'm going to show you first off... First off, I'm going to tell you: Don't do this, don't copy. And I'm going to teach you ways in order to improve yourself and your answer by changing this wording. How can you change your introduction so it's different than what the question is? Okay? So, let's look at how to make these changes. Okay, so what we are going to do in order to change the question into a proper answer that doesn't just copy the question, is we are going to paraphrase. So, the word here is: "paraphrase". This might be a new word for you. What does it mean to paraphrase something? Well, when we paraphrase, it means we take a sentence that, you know... We take somebody else's sentence and we change it into our own words. Okay? So, we change the words of a sentence, we also change maybe the sentence structure, but we keep all the same meaning. Okay? So, the meaning from the sentence you copy, it stays the same, same meaning, but different words and different sentence structure. Okay? So it's in your words, but this other person's meaning. So, we are going to paraphrase this example of a question into our own words. So, first we're going to look at how to do that using vocabulary and synonyms. So, we have here the same question: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country." How can we put this into new words or our own words that keep the same meaning? Well, we can use synonyms. So, this might be a new word for you, too. A "synonym". "Synonyms" are words that have the same meaning, but are different words.

12 Shocking Habits of Successful People

What are the successful people habits we should all be aware of? What do they do differently to make more money, operate efficiently, and live healthier, and happier lives than the general population? In this video, you will find out the 12 shocking habits of successful people that define a new generation of thinkers and doers. Want more videos like this one? Subscribe to the TopThink youtube channel for weekly uploads about psychology, science, and lots of other nerdy stuff! Music: "Straight" from Bensound.com Video script written by Tristan Reed Video creation from the owner of 'TopThink' Icon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com

After watching this, your brain will not be the same | Lara Boyd | TEDxVancouver

In a classic research-based TEDx Talk, Dr. Lara Boyd describes how neuroplasticity gives you the power to shape the brain you want. Recorded at TEDxVancouver at Rogers Arena on November 14, 2015. YouTube Tags: brain science, brain, stroke, neuroplasticity, science, motor learning, identity, TED, TEDxVancouver, TEDxVancouver 2015, Vancouver, TEDx, Rogers Arena, Vancouver speakers, Vancouver conference, ideas worth spreading, great idea, Our knowledge of the brain is evolving at a breathtaking pace, and Dr. Lara Boyd is positioned at the cutting edge of these discoveries. In 2006, she was recruited by the University of British Columbia to become the Canada Research Chair in Neurobiology and Motor Learning. Since that time she has established the Brain Behaviour Lab, recruited and trained over 40 graduate students, published more than 80 papers and been awarded over $5 million in funding. Dr. Boyd’s efforts are leading to the development of novel, and more effective, therapeutics for individuals with brain damage, but they are also shedding light on broader applications. By learning new concepts, taking advantage of opportunities, and participating in new activities, you are physically changing who you are, and opening up a world of endless possibility. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

"I stopped smoking" or "I stopped to smoke"?

http://www.engvid.com/ I stopped to talk or I stopped talking? What is the difference in meaning? In this lesson, we will look at the verb "to stop" and when it should be followed by a gerund or an infinitive. The meaning of "I stopped to smoke" and "I stopped smoking" is very different. Watch this video and find out what the difference is. Then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/stopped-or-stopped-to/

http://www.engvid.com/ Want to become a better writer? In this video, I will share five easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. If you're in college or university or plan to study overseas, this video is for you! Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/

Next, watch my Top 5 Writing Tips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu2gm-Y4RXs

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